16.10.2018

Skyjack Lift Enabler goes global

Skyjack has formally launched its Secondary Guarding Lift Enable (SGLE) system as a worldwide option on its full scissor lift range, including its SJ112 and SJ16 mast type lifts.

The simple enable button is designed to reduce the risk of entrapment caused by inadvertent machine operation while leaning over the guardrails. The company began testing the system last year and decided earlier this year decided that the feedback was positive enough to move forward to the production stage, initially as an option for the European, Middle East and Africa region. See Skyjack Lift Enabler

The system will now be available as an option on a global basis, it can also be easily retrofitted. The system requires the operator to press a tamper proof button on the left had side of the controller as well as operating the joystick, in order to operate the lift function.
The Lift Enabler button is intended to keep the operator within the platform area

The release of either joystick or enable button will stop the lift function immediately. The ergonomics are such that the operator’s body is kept in an upright position and away from the guardrails, mitigating the risk of entrapment. The enable button is not required for lowering the platform or for driving, those functions are controlled by the joystick only.

Product and business development manager David Hall said: “Skyjack is committed to creating equipment that contributes to safe workplaces and our machines are designed with a variety of safety measures in mind as a standard. When introducing SGLE, we paid particular attention to the provision of an additional measure while maintaining the utility and simple operation of the aerial platform.”

Vertikal Comment

This is a perfectly functional addition which should help reduce the chances of an overhead crushing incident without adding complexity, significant cost or more beeping and cut out devices. However Skyjack has also been trialling a more sophisticated system that uses ultrasound beams to warn of overhead obstacles with a built in cut out and override system. Dubbed the Platform Protection Alert of PPA for short, it was shown at the ARA Rental show in February, but has yet to make it through to production. See Rental show wrap up and scroll down to Skyjack

The PPA system will appeal to those contractors or rental companies that are looking for something more all sophisticated that can also warn an operator that there is an obstacle directly overhead. It is possible that Skyjack will wait to see if demand warrants the introduction of a more complex system, given that crushing incidents on scissor lifts are quite rare - although they do occur.

Comments

UE Components
I personally do not understand offering a solid cover that blocks the view of the controls, then add a button out of sight that means the operator has to look down to select it.
Surely you want the operator to be aware of their surroundings rather than fumbling for a button with gloved hands?

Always different ways to approach a problem, but I do think this solves one and potentially causes another.
My views, not those of the company. Scott

17 Oct 2018

Access Jim
I agree, and the introduction of a lot of secondary guarding systems introduces operator complacency.
In other words 'why should i bother looking and observing around me when i have all these devices protecting me'
Also, we have the problem with accidental triggering of the device which is another major issue.
Training and proper observation and control is the key here.

16 Oct 2018

Access Jim
I agree, and the introduction of a lot of secondary guarding systems introduces operator complacency.
In other words 'why should i bother looking and observing around me when i have all these devices protecting me'
Also, we have the problem with accidental triggering of the device which is another major issue.
Training and proper observation and control is the key here.

16 Oct 2018

AccessibL
All worthy attempts... but is it not tedious to treat trained operators as idiots? Where do we draw the line, folks? Do we train people to do things properly, and then trust them to do so, or do we treat every last person as an imbecile, and make some stupid rules up to constrain their working day? Should IPAF be training to higher standards to minimise all this waste? What standards? I'd be interested to hear.

16 Oct 2018
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